ISSUE THREE

THIS IS WHY I REBEL

James ‘Iggy’ Fox died on 6 February. He was 25, had given up a career in science to join XR and fought hard for the cause, especially for Indigenous rights. Iggy was a burning bright soul and he will be deeply missed by us all. Here is the article he wrote for issue 3 of The Hourglass newspaper. Science alone is silence. For people to act on science’s warnings and apply its solutions, its message needs shouting from the rooftops. Scientists are getting on the streets, refusing to be scribes of the apocalypse. After seven years studying, researching and…

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Comment is priceless – LESS POLAR BEARS, MORE PEOPLE: AN IMPERSONAL CRISIS

When you search the words ‘climate change’ online, the images are of melting glaciers, polar bears stranded on sea ice, disturbing graphics of an Earth on fire, and fossil fuel power stations. These images have come to represent climate change, but where are all the people? Imagery and videos are a huge part of how we understand climate change, depicting some of the catastrophic impacts on our planet. In Natural History documentaries, landscapes characterised by ice – or lack thereof – usually take centre stage to tell the story of the global climate crisis – remember THAT walrus scene…

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Comment is priceless – CYCLING IS CORE TO CLIMATE CAMPAIGNING

Transport emissions are the largest source of UK direct emissions, at 33%. They have remained stubbornly high since 1990, while emissions from electricity dropped 60%. Parallel to the climate and ecological emergencies the UK is also has diabetes, obesity and asthma crises. All three conditions have transport related contributory factors. The loudly trumpeted switch to electric vehicles (EVs) is not the solution to these crises. The embodied carbon of the manufacture of both EV and fossil fuelled cars is equal to the average annual electricity emissions from a UK household for seven to forty-five years! Luckily, there is an…

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STAYING WARM IN A HOUSE ON FIRE

Paradoxically, global heating is likely to result in colder winters in Britain, as the temperate Gulf Stream falters, and disruption to the polar vortex unleashes the Beast from the East. At the same time, burning more fossil fuels to stay warm is the last thing we need. We can do a little to help reduce our fuel use (and bills) by putting on warmer clothes instead of turning up the thermostat, shutting doors and windows and blocking up draughts, but personal efforts can only help marginally. The big changes have to be made at government levels. Heating consumes over…

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Why did a 61 year old Chinese man decide to get arrested?

The stereotype of Chinese people is that we keep our heads down, steer clear of authority and are quietly successful. This stereotype has some truth to it. However, for me, the urgency of climate change and its impact on the country I come from (Malaysia), has created an unshakable sense of duty to act. Many people of colour feel more vulnerability since the country voted for Brexit, which makes the idea of arrest much more daunting for us than before. So as well as carrying a ‘bust card’ with phone numbers of solicitors, I also took along photos of my…

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Thames and Rainham Marshes walk

Murder comes with a sudden pounce under a clear blue sky out in the marshes. The victim struggles, wriggles and flails, but its assailant has clearly killed before. With one gulp the heron swallows the marsh frog whole. The nearby cows don’t even look up. A reed bunting lightens the mood with a joyful “lets-all-move- on” aria, at about 100 notes a second. I am on Rainham Marshes, one of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds’ (RSPB) most unlikely reserves. Its setting could not be busier. On one side, a sinuous Eurostar glides past to Paris.

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Hadrian’s Wall Path

The frozen path booms dully under my boots. On my right a burn runs the colour of Bisto. Oak leaves corkscrew limply down. In Whistle Stop Walks, I take the train to a station, walk on, and pick up the train home somewhere down the line. As close as I can get to a zero carbon day out. I am in a little green valley just north of Haltwhistle in Northumberland. On a craggy summit like a crusty loaf is Hadrian’s Wall. I fill my notebook with hopeless artists’ impressions. But even their amateurish inexactitude cannot obscure this…

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GROW YOUR OWN FOOD WITH INDOOR GARDENING

No matter where you live, whether you have a garden, balcony, fire escape or windowsill, growing some of your own fresh produce can be a positive action against climate change. There are no food miles from pot to plate, no plastic packaging or chemical sprays involved, just lovingly tendered home grown organic produce that is as fresh as fresh can be. You’ll perhaps be surprised by the variety of fare that can realistically (and easily) be grown in even the smallest space at this time of year. Plus, the joy of germinating a seed into a plant into food provides…

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HOW I USE ART AS A FORM OF ACTIVISM

I am a full time student and I am not specialised in anything yet, I feel like I am always learning but am still trying to work out what I could ever teach beyond the obvious impacts and causes of climate change. I know I love crafts and so I recently began a type of embroidery called punch needling. My materials were funded by a charity called the Mark Evison Foundation who give grants to students looking to learn something new or go on an expedition planned by themselves, but most of it was made with reused materials that…

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Comment is priceless – NATIVE AMERICAN PIPELINE RESISTANCE

Here in the U.S., Native communities continue to stand on the front lines of the climate crisis. A couple weeks back, the Keystone pipeline leaked more than 383,000 gallons of oil onto our homelands, because as surely as pipelines carry oil, they end up spilling. What timing. As federal regulators temporarily shut down Keystone because pipelines can’t be trusted, many of my relatives were gearing up to attend a public hearing this past Wednesday on whether the North Dakota Public Service Commission should allow a dramatic increase to the flow rate through the infamous Dakota Access pipeline (DAPL).

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